RECIPES

Shepherd’s Pie

There’s nip in the air. Bangalore feels like Bangalore again FINALLY!! Woke up this morning and a sudden craving happened.

NEED TO BAKE SHEPHERD’S PIE.

Why?

Is that even a question to ask?

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Run to my kitchen immediately and work in progress.

Sugar is getting to me these days. I still am in a serious relationship with my desserts but trying my best to cut down for health reasons so experimenting with more savoury dishes on the blog. There’s nothing more comforting than a warm, enormous serving of this casserole that gives me instant pleasure. It’s a complete mood changer, I tell you!!

Very often, cottage pie is mistaken for shepherd’s pie. Both pies are frugal dishes derived from the 18th century where the poorer people, who lived in cottages, would make the pies from leftovers. The difference is, shepherd’s pie is made with ground lamb and cottage pie is made with ground beef.

It is said to have probably originated in Scotland and in the north of England.The dish as we know it, though, couldn’t have originated before potatoes became generally accepted in the UK, which wasn’t until the end of the 1700s. Before that, the dish or a very similar one was made in Scotland, but topped with a pastry crust instead of mashed potato.

It came about when the potato was extremely cheap and abundant and is a great way of getting rid of old veggies in your fridge. Every household have their own recipe with a variation. But my mama taught me to incorporate our Indian flavours while making cheese and mash, the star of the dish.

The traditional recipe has only peas and carrots but I like adding sweet corn too. It just adds a punch of flavour. Also, the addition of sauces makes it a more homely meal. The meat of the dish is most likely lamb but you could use beef like the Americans if that’s your preference.But I would honestly suggest that you stick with lamb as it gives a wonderful flavour to the dish.If you’re vegetarian, don’t worry, you could just eliminate the meat and it would taste just as good.

It is humble and simple but very filling and is perfect for your next dinner party or pot luck. It’s one of the star dishes at all my family functions. And the best part is it can also be frozen for months. So when you’re hungry, just take a portion out and heat. Your tummy shall be fullfilled.

A wonderful clean-out-the-fridge dish. A lot of people make it on thanksgiving as they find it a good excuse to make good use of their leftovers. But I don’t really need a reason to bake this pie.

Here’s my Mama’s Indian spiced version. A new spin to the classic dish.

Lamb cooked in mild spices and sauces, baked with mash and cheese.

 

Warm, buttery and all things good…

 

You can’t go wrong with this dish. And don’t forget to always make extra.

 

 

Print Recipe
Shepherd's Pie
A classic British family recipe that is ultimate comfort food
Course main course
Cuisine british
Prep Time 40 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Servings
people
Ingredients
For the mince mixture
For the mash:
Course main course
Cuisine british
Prep Time 40 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Servings
people
Ingredients
For the mince mixture
For the mash:
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan and add the onion and carrots. Cook for about 5 minutes.
  2. Once soft, add the peas and sweetcorn and mix well.
  3. Crumble in the lamb and brown, tipping off any excess fat. Add the ginger garlic paste,tomato purée, soy sauce and worcestershire sauce, then fry for a few mins. Pour some water, bring to a simmer, add the chilli flakes then cover and cook for about 30 mins. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 180 degrees C.
  4. To make the mash, boil potatoes in salted water for 10-15 mins until soft. Drain, then mash with the butter, warm milk and half of the grated cheese. Keep aside.
  5. Once the mince has cooked, put this mixture into an ovenproof dish and top with the mash. Sprinkle remaining cheese over. Bake for about 30-35 mins until it starts to get golden brown and the cheese has melted.
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